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eCOGRA, the internationally renowned independent testing lab are proud to announce that as part of their plans to expand into the United States they have just been authorised by Executive Director Orders to offer certification services as an independent testing laboratory (ITL) in Michigan.

Having completed extensive rigorous checks with the Michigan Gaming Control Board (MGCB) they have now been acknowledged as a suitable ITL. This means that in addition to the authorisation received last year from Pennsylvania, eCOGRA can now offer a full suite of regulatory certifications to online gambling operators and suppliers in these states. eCOGRA also holds minor vendor licenses in Colorado and New Jersey, allowing them to offer third party cybersecurity testing and certification.

The MGCB’s mission is to ensure the conduct of fair and honest gaming to protect the interests of the citizens of the state of Michigan and so the regulatory review process was in-depth and comprehensive. eCOGRA is the first laboratory headquartered outside of the US to be assessed as fit by the MGCB after undergoing rigorous probity and technical capability checks.

Shaun McCallaghan, eCOGRA Chief Executive Officer added “We are committed to expanding our service offering to new jurisdictions that are important to our clients and will continue pursuing approvals where our services are required, being the preferred ITL. Authorisation to operate in Michigan by the highly respected MGCB is a significant achievement and step forward for eCOGRA.”

This latest authorisation to offer certification services in Michigan brings eCOGRA’s total jurisdictions to 34 across 4 continents. These can be viewed on their website https://ecogra.org/about-us/jurisdictional-approvals. eCOGRA remain committed to servicing their clients in each of the regulated markets where they choose to license their online gambling products. eCOGRA have never had any of their accreditations suspended or revoked, or any application for approval by a jurisdictional regulator rejected.